Biblical Studies

The field of Biblical Studies includes the subjects of Bible Introduction, Old Testament, New Testament, Hebrew, and Greek.

Bible Introduction

BI 211 Bible Geography (Fall 2014; Fall 2015)
This course involves a survey of the geographical backgrounds of the lands of the Bible. Biblical geography is considered in the physical setting of sacred scripture the progressive relation of the redemptive movements beginning with Abraham and culminating with Jesus and the apostles in the Roman Empire.

BI 212 Manners and Customs of Bible Times (Spring 2015; Spring 2016)
This course involves the study of manners and customs of the people who lived in Bible lands. The Bible should be interpreted in the light of Eastern customs and culture.

BI 411 Introduction to Bible Study (As Needed)
A study of the devotional use of the Bible informs the student of the various methods and steps of inductive Bible study, including observation, interpretation, evaluation, and application.

BI 412 Biblical Backgrounds (Fall 2014)
A study of the historical and/or geographical backgrounds of the Old or New Testament is made, including the manners and customs of ancient Near Eastern peoples and/or archaeological discoveries which illuminate the Bible. Note: The course may be repeated when different materials are covered.

BI 413 Introduction to Language Tools (As Needed)
This study consists of a nontechnical approach to the use of Bible lexicons, concordances, atlases, and dictionaries which ordinarily are limited to “professional” language students. Interpretative studies of selected biblical texts highlight the study.

BI 414 Introduction to Hermeneutics (Every Spring)
As a basic orientation to understanding the Bible in its literary and historical-cultural contexts, the student will be introduced to various literary genres (such as narrative, prophecy, law, poetry, wisdom literature, parables, epistles, and apocalyptic writings) with suggested guidelines for understanding and communicating the message of a passage according to its specific literary type. The question of how to discern timeless principles in contrast to culturally-bound teachings will be addressed as a part of the process of learning to apply the Bible in a valid way. Prerequisite: OT 113.

BI 511 Selected Topics in Bible Introduction (Fall 2014)
Studies in various facets of Bible Introduction are made. These may include Bible study methods or historical/cultural or geographical background studies such as manners and customs or archaeological discoveries which illuminate the Bible. Note: The course may be repeated with different subject matter.

BI 514 Biblical Hermeneutics (Every Spring)
Focusing on the art and science of understanding the Scriptures in their literary and historical-cultural contexts, the acquisition and application of key guidelines for unlocking the meaning and message of any biblical passage according to its specific literary genre will be stressed. The question of how to determine timeless principles in contrast to culturally-bound teachings will be addressed as a part of the process of learning to apply the Bible in a valid way. Prerequisite: one of the following—OT 511; OT 512; NT 511; NT 512—or concurrent enrollment.

Greek

Grk 311 Greek Appreciation (Every Summer)
This course is designed to give the student a basic introduction to the Greek language. The student will learn the Greek Alphabet as well as a limited vocabulary of Greek words. Additionally, the student will learn some of the basics of Greek grammar.

Grk 411 Greek Grammar I (Every Fall)
The student is introduced to the fundamentals of Koine Greek. Emphasis is given to acquiring a basic vocabulary and learning case functions and verb endings.

Grk 412 Greek Grammar II (Every Spring)
This is a continuation of Grk 411. Emphasis is given to grammar and syntax and the development of translation skills. Translation exercises include verses from the Johannine writings. Prerequisite: Grk 411.

Grk 415 Intermediate Greek (Summer as Needed)
An intensive review of basic principles of grammar and translation for students who need or desire further instruction before taking Grk 421 or Grk 621. Note: This course is not intended as a substitute for Grk 421 or 621.

Grk 421 Greek Translation I (Every Fall)
Translation skills are developed and sharpened by the inductive method through the translation of selected passages from the historical writings of the New Testament. Translation and the acquisition and retention of vocabulary are emphasized. Prerequisite: Grk 412. Note: Master’s students may take the course for elective credit only.

Grk 422 Greek Translation II (Every Spring)
A further development of the basic skills of translation and interpretation are achieved by the inductive method through the translation of selected passages from the epistles of the New Testament. Prerequisite: Grk 412. Note: Master’s students may take the course for elective credit only.

Grk 511 Greek Grammar I (Every Fall)
The student is introduced to the fundamentals of Koine Greek. Emphasis is given to acquiring a foundational vocabulary and learning case functions and verb endings.

Grk 512 Greek Grammar II (Every Spring)
This is a continuation of Grk 511. Emphasis is given to grammar and syntax and the development of translation and interpretive skills. Translation exercises include verses from the Johannine writings. This course, in conjunction with Grk 511, is designed to prepare the student for exegesis. Prerequisite: Grk 511.

Grk 621 Greek Exegesis I (Every Fall)
This course consists of exegetical and interpretative studies in the historical or apostolic writings of the New Testament. Translation skills are improved through an inductive study of Greek grammar and syntax. Interpretation skills are enhanced through the development of word studies. Vocabulary acquisition and retention are emphasized. Prerequisite: Grk 412 or Grk 512.

Grk 622 Greek Exegesis II (Every Spring)
The student’s exegetical and interpretive skills are further developed by the study of the principles of syntax and exegesis of selected historical or apostolic writings. The student is introduced to textual criticism by means of variant analysis and will conduct independent exegetical research of a select passage. Grammar, vocabulary, and syntax are emphasized. Prerequisite: Grk 621.

Hebrew

Heb 511 Hebrew Grammar I (Every Fall)
This is an introduction to basic Hebrew grammar and syntax. Acquiring a vocabulary, developing various grammatical skills by doing translation exercises, and learning the paradigms of the Qal and niphal verbal stems are emphasized.

Heb 512 Hebrew Grammar II (Every Spring)
As a continuation of basic Hebrew grammar and syntax (Heb 511), translation and parsing are emphasized through recognition of patterns of the seven verbal stems, including the weak verbs. Translation exercises include several verses, primarily from Genesis.

Heb 515 Hebrew Review and Reading (Summer as Needed)
An intensive review of Hebrew grammar and basic syntax and vocabulary with applied readings from selected portions of the Old Testament. Prerequisite: Heb 511 and 512

Heb 621 Introduction to Hebrew Exegesis (Every Fall)
The student is introduced to the basic tools and methods of Hebrew exegesis (including word studies) with application of these methods to selected readings in Hebrew narrative and poetry. An attempt is made to correlate (or “bridge the gap” between) exegesis and the teaching and preaching of the Word. Prerequisite: Heb 511 and 512. Note: All students must take Heb 621 to satisfy the M.Div. requirement for Hebrew exegesis. The course may be repeated with additional requirements when a different area is studied.

Heb 622 Hebrew Exegesis (As Needed)
This course consists of exegetical studies in a book (or books) which will enable the student to review and refine the basic steps of exegesis. Emphasis is given to improving translation skills through an inductive review of Hebrew grammar and syntax and vocabulary acquisition and retention. Prerequisite: Heb 621. Note: The course may be repeated when a different area is studied.

New Testament

NT 123 New Testament Survey (Every Semester)
This course is a survey of the entire New Testament. The general background, authorship, and content of the various books of the New Testament are covered. The life and work of Jesus, the organization of churches and early missionary enterprises are especially stressed.

NT 213 Life of Christ (Every Fall)
An examination is made of the factual basis of Christianity as it is found in the life and teaching of Jesus Christ. The purpose of the course is to promote subjective comprehension and response to the basic truths of Christianity which emerge from the gospels of Matthew, Mark, Luke and John.

NT 223 Life of Paul (Every Spring)
This course is designed to enlighten the student in Pauline chronology and to survey pertinent historical incidents which affected or coincided with his ministry. Special emphasis is given to the environmental background of early Christianity as recorded in the Acts of the Apostles.

NT 421 Studies in the Gospels (Summer 2015)
Topical and exegetical studies are made in the Synoptic and/or Johannine gospels with emphasis on important theological concepts and great events in the life of Christ, such as the Messianic consciousness of Jesus, His miracles, and His parabolic teachings. Note: The course may be repeated when different topics and events are studied. Prerequisite: NT 123 or NT 511.

NT 422 New Testament Interpretation (Fall 2014)
This course consists of analytical and interpretative studies in Acts or one or more New Testament epistles. Emphasis is given to the application of New Testament precepts to current situations in life. Introductory and background materials receive only abbreviated treatment. Note: The course may be repeated when a different book (or books) is studied. Prerequisite: NT 123 or 511 or 512, depending upon the book(s) studied.

NT 511 New Testament Introduction and Survey I (Every Fall)
A study of the political, social, religious, and economic world of the New Testament is made by examining the major events of the intertestamental period leading up to the first century, including Judaism and its sects; the life of Christ; first century New Testament churches; New Testament canon; the Gospels and Acts.

NT 512 New Testament Introduction and Survey II (Every Spring)
This course is a continuation of NT 511. Special attention is given to the background, date of composition, structural outline and authorship of the Pauline epistles, the General epistles, the Johannine epistles and Revelation.

NT 621 New Testament Exposition (Fall 2014; Summer 2015)
This course is a directed exposition of one or more of the New Testament writings. Emphasis is given to the discovery of the historical purposes, theological content, and practical applications of the teachings of the book(s) studied. Note: The course may be repeated when different books are studied. Prerequisite: NT 511 or 512, depending upon the book(s) studied.

NT 631 New Testament Theology (As Needed)
This course deals with the primary elements of New Testament theology. The theological emphases distinctive to individual New Testament writers are noted as well as the essential unity of Christian thought in the New Testament. Note: This course also qualifies for credit in the theological-historical field (see TH 621).

NT 632 Special Studies in the New Testament (As Needed)
Advanced and specialized studies are made in various facets of the New Testament. These may include current approaches to New Testament Interpretation, studies in the canonization of the New Testament and New Testament criticism.

Old Testament

OT 113 Old Testament Survey (Every Semester)
This course is a general survey of the entire Old Testament, including history, geography, and literature. The origin and growth of the Hebrew nation are emphasized.

OT 421 Old Testament Interpretation (Spring 2015; Summer 2016)
This is a historical and interpretative study of a book (or group of related books). Literary structure (outline), suggested purpose of the book (or books), and the historical context are emphasized as means to interpret individual passages. Note: The course may be repeated when different books are studied. Prerequisite: OT 113 or 511 or 512, depending upon the book(s) studied.

OT 511 Old Testament Introduction and Survey I (Every Fall)
This course consists of an examination of Old Testament introductory problems (including canonicity, textual criticism and higher criticism) and a historical and interpretative survey of the Pentateuch and other historical books. The structure and purpose of these books are emphasized.

OT 512 Old Testament Introduction and Survey II (Every Spring)
This is a historical and interpretative survey of the poetic and prophetic writings of the Old Testament. Special emphasis is given to the historical background, structure and purpose of these books.

OT 621 Old Testament Exposition (Spring 2015; Summer 2016)
This course is a guided exposition of a book (or group of books) with emphasis on the historical/cultural and literary contexts. The literary structure and possible purpose statement will be explored as a part of the process of interpreting and communicating the message of specific passages. Note: The course may be repeated when different books are studied. Prerequisite: OT 511 or 512, depending upon the book(s) studied.

OT 631 Old Testament Theology (Fall 2014)
Basic theological concepts in the Old Testament and various methods of approach to Old Testament Theology are explored. The question of the “center” or main thrust of the Old Testament and/or its relationship to the New Testament and New Testament Theology is also discussed. Prerequisite: OT 511 and 512 (or concurrent enrollment in the latter). Note: Students may receive credit for this course in the theological-historical field (see TH 621).

OT 632 Special Studies in Old Testament (As needed)
Specialized studies in various facets of the Old Testament are made. These may include Old Testament introductory problems such as biblical archaeology or the use of the Old Testament in the New. They may consist of advanced studies or seminars in other areas such as the study of a book or a group of books pertaining to the Old Testament. Prerequisite: OT 511 and 512 (or concurrent enrollment in the latter).