Courses

 

Courses & Fields of Study

Students should be directed in the selection of courses by the requirements of their particular degree plan, and in accordance with the following guidelines: associate students may take courses numbered 100-400; bachelor's students, courses numbered 300-400; master's students, courses numbered 300-600. All courses are for three semester hours of credit. The projected dates are tentative and subject to change. The dates mostly reflect courses scheduled on the seminary’s main campus.

BIBLICAL STUDIES FIELD

Introduction

BI 411. Introduction to Bible Study (Fall/2008)

A study of the devotional use of the Bible is made which informs the student of the various methods and steps of inductive Bible study, including observation, interpretation, evaluation, and application.

BI 412. Biblical Backgrounds (Spring/2010)

A study of the historical and/or geographical backgrounds of the Old or New Testament is made, including the manners and customs of ancient Near Eastern peoples and/or archaeological discoveries which illuminate the Bible. Note: The course may be repeated when different materials are covered.

BI 413. Introduction to Language Tools (Fall/2009)

This study consists of a nontechnical approach to usage of Bible lexicons, concordances, atlases, and dictionaries which ordinarily are limited to “professional” language students. Interpretative studies of selected biblical texts highlight the study.

BI 414. Introduction to Hermeneutics (Spring/2009; 2010)

As a basic orientation to understanding the Bible in its literary and historical-cultural contexts, the student will be introduced to various literary genres (such as narrative, prophecy, law, poetry, wisdom literature, parables, epistles, and apocalyptic writings) with suggested guidelines for understanding and communicating the message of a passage according to its specific literary type. The question of how to discern timeless principles in contrast to culturally-bound teachings will be addressed as a part of the process of learning to apply the Bible in a valid way. Prerequisite: OT 113.

BI 511. Selected Topics in Bible Introduction (As Needed)

Studies in various facets of Bible Introduction are made. These may include Bible study methods or historical/cultural or geographical background studies such as manners and customs or archaeological discoveries which illuminate the Bible.  Note: The course may be repeated when different subject matter.

BI 514 Biblical Hermeneutics (Spring/2009; 2010)

Focusing on the art and science of understanding the Scriptures in their literary and historical-cultural contexts, the acquisition and application of key guidelines for unlocking the meaning and message of any biblical passage according to its specific literary genre will be stressed. The question of how to determine timeless principles in contrast to culturally-bound teachings will be addressed as a part of the process of learning to apply the Bible in a valid way. Prerequisite: one of the following—OT511; OT 512; NT511; NT512—or concurrent enrollment.

Old Testament

OT 421. Old Testament Interpretation (Spring/2009; 2010)

This is a historical and interpretative study of a book (or group of related books). Literary structure (outline), suggested purpose of the book (or books), and the historical context are emphasized as means to interpret individual passages. Note: The course may be repeated when different books are studied. Prerequisite: OT 113 or 511 or 512, depending upon the book(s) studied.

OT 511. Old Testament Introduction and Survey I (Fall/2008)

This course consists of an examination of Old Testament introductory problems (including canonicity, textual criticism and higher criticism) and a historical and interpretative survey of the Pentateuch and other historical books. The structure and purpose of these books are emphasized.

OT 512. Old Testament Introduction and Survey II (Spring/2009; Jan. 2010)

This is a historical and interpretative survey of the poetic and prophetic writings of the Old Testament. Special emphasis is given to the historical background, structure and purpose of these books.

OT 621. Old Testament Exposition (Spring/2009; 2010)

This course is a guided exposition of a book (or group of books) with emphasis on the historical/cultural and literary contexts. The literary structure and possible purpose statement will be explored as a part of the process of interpreting and communicating the message of specific passages. Note: The course may be repeated when different books are studied.  Prerequisite: OT 511 or 512, depending upon the book(s) studied.

OT 631. Old Testament Theology (Spring/2009)

Basic theological concepts in the Old Testament and various methods of approach to Old Testament theology are explored. The question of the “center” or main thrust of the Old Testament and/or its relationship to the New Testament and New Testament theology is also discussed. Prerequisite: OT 511 and 512 (or concurrent enrollment in the latter).  Note: Students may receive credit for this course in the theological-historical field (see Th 621).

OT 632. Special Studies in Old Testament (As needed)

Specialized studies in various facets of the Old Testament are made. These may include Old Testament introductory problems such as biblical archaeology or the use of the Old Testament in the New. They may consist of advanced studies or seminars in other areas such as the study of a book or a group of books pertaining to the Old Testament. Prerequisite: OT 511 and 512 (or concurrent enrollment in the latter).

New Testament

NT 213. Life of Christ (Fall/2008)

An examination is made of the factual basis of Christianity as it is found in the life and teaching of Jesus Christ. The purpose of the course is to promote subjective comprehension and response to the basic truths of Christianity which emerge from the gospels according to Matthew, Mark, Luke and John.

NT 223. Life of Paul (Spring/2009)

This course is designed to enlighten the student in Pauline chronology and to survey pertinent historical incidents which affected or coincided with his ministry. Special emphasis is given to the environmental background of early Christianity as recorded in the Acts of the Apostles.

NT 421. Studies in the Gospels (Spring/2009)

Topical and exegetical studies in the Synoptic and/or Johannine gospels with emphasis on important theological concepts and great events in the life of Christ, such as the Messianic consciousness of Jesus, His miracles, and His parabolic teachings. Note: The course may be repeated when different topics and events are studied. Prerequisite: NT 123 or NT 511.

NT 422. New Testament Interpretation (Spring/2008)

This course consists of analytical and interpretative studies in Acts or one or more New Testament epistles. Emphasis is given to the application of New Testament precepts to current situations in life. Introductory and background materials receive only abbreviated treatment. Note: The course may be repeated when a different book (or books) is studied. Prerequisite: NT 123 or 511 or 512, depending upon the book(s) studied.

NT 511. New Testament Introduction and Survey I (Fall/2008; 2005; Sum/2009)

A study of the political, social, religious, and economic world of the New Testament is made, including Judaism and its sects; the life of Christ; first century New Testament churches; New Testament canon; the Gospels and Acts.

NT 512. New Testament Introduction and Survey II (Spring/2009; 2010)

This course is a continuation of NT 511. Special attention is given to the background, date of composition, structural outline and authorship of the Pauline epistles, the General epistles, the Johannine epistles and Revelation.

NT 621. New Testament Exposition (Fall/2008; 2009)

This course is a directed exposition of one or more of the New Testament writings. Emphasis is given to the discovery of the historical purposes, theological content, and practical applications of the teachings of the book(s) studied.  Note: The course may be repeated when different books are studied. Prerequisite: NT 511 or 512, depending upon the book(s) studied.

NT 631. New Testament Theology (As Needed)

This course deals with the primary elements of New Testament theology. The theological emphases distinctive to individual New Testament writers are noted as well as the essential unity of Christian thought in the New Testament. Note: This course also qualifies for credit in the theological-historical field (see Th 621.)

NT 632. Special Studies in the New Testament (As Needed)

Advanced and specialized studies are made in various facets of the New Testament. These may include current approaches to New Testament Interpretation, studies in the canonization of the New Testament and New Testament criticism.

Hebrew

Heb 511. Hebrew Grammar I (Every Fall)

This is an introduction to basic Hebrew grammar and syntax. Acquiring a vocabulary, developing various grammatical skills by doing translation exercises, and learning the paradigms of the Qal verb stem are emphasized.

Heb 512. Hebrew Grammar II (Every Spring)

As a continuation of basic Hebrew grammar and syntax (Heb 511), translation and parsing are emphasized through recognition of patterns of the seven verbal stems, including the weak verbs. Translation exercises include several verses primarily from Genesis.

Heb 515. Hebrew Review and Reading (Summer As Needed)

An intensive review of Hebrew grammar and basic syntax and vocabulary with applied readings from selected portions of the Old Testament. Prerequisite: Heb 511and 512.

Heb 621. Introduction to Hebrew Exegesis (Every Fall)

The student is introduced to the basic tools and methods of Hebrew exegesis (including word studies) with application of these methods to selected readings in Hebrew narrative and poetry. An attempt is made to correlate (or “bridge the gap” between) exegesis and the teaching and preaching of the Word. Prerequisite: Heb 511 and 512.  Note: All students must take Heb 621 to satisfy the M.Div. requirement for Hebrew exegesis. The course may be repeated with additional requirements when a different area is studied.

Heb 622. Hebrew Exegesis (As Needed)

This course consists of exegetical studies in a book (or books) which will enable the student to review and refine the basic steps of exegesis. Emphasis is given to improving translation skills through an inductive review of Hebrew grammar and syntax and vocabulary acquisition and retention. Prerequisite: Heb 621.  Note:  The course may be repeated when a different area is studied.

Greek

Grk 411. Greek Grammar I (Every Fall)

The student is introduced to the fundamentals of Koine Greek. Emphasis is given to acquiring a basic vocabulary and learning case functions and verb endings.

Grk 412. Greek Grammar II (Every Spring)

This is a continuation of Grk 411. Emphasis is given to grammar and syntax and the development of translation skills. Translation exercises include verses from the Johannine writings.

Grk 415. Intermediate Greek (Every Summer)

An intensive review of basic principles of grammar and translation for students who need or desire further instruction before taking Grk 421 or Grk 621. Note: This course is not intended as a substitute for Grk 421 or 621.

Grk 421. Greek Translation I (Every Fall)

Translation skills are developed and sharpened by the inductive method through the translation of selected passages from the historical writings of the New Testament. Translation and the acquisition and retention of vocabulary are emphasized. Prerequisite: Grk 411 and 412. Note: Master’s students may take the course for elective credit only.

Grk 422. Greek Translation II (Every Spring)

A further development of the basic skills of translation and interpretation are achieved by the inductive method through the translation of selected passages from the epistles of the New Testament. Prerequisite: Grk 411 and 412. Note: Master’s students may take the course for elective credit only.

Grk 621. Greek Exegesis I (Every Fall)

This course consists of exegetical and interpretative studies in the historical or apostolic writings of the New Testament. Translation skills are improved through an inductive study of Greek grammar and syntax. Vocabulary acquisition and retention are emphasized. Prerequisite: Grk 411 and 412.

Grk 622. Greek Exegesis II (Every Spring)

The student’s exegetical and interpretative skills are further developed by the study of the principles of syntax and exegesis of selected historical or apostolic writings. Grammar and syntax are emphasized. Prerequisite: Grk 411 and 412.

Note: Any two courses marked Grk 621 or Grk 622 will satisfy the M.Div. requirement for Greek exegesis.

THEOLOGICAL-HISTORICAL STUDIES FIELD

Theology

Th 411. Christian Doctrine I (Fall/2008; 2009)

The first in a two-course sequence, this course provides an historical and systematic introduction to the major doctrines of the Christian faith. The study includes inquiry into the fields of Bibliology, Theology, Angelology, Anthropology, and Hamartiology.

Th 412. Christian Doctrine II (Spring/2009; 2010)

This course is a continuation of Th. 411. Fields of examination include Christology, Soteriology, Ecclesiology, and Eschatology. Emphasis is given to acquiring an understanding of God’s redemptive purposes as revealed in the Bible.

Th 415. Christian Devotional Literature (Every Semester)

This is a reading course in Christian devotional literature, designed to stimulate spiritual growth in seminarians by means of first-hand acquaintance with selected portions of great Christian literature.  Note: This course must be approved on an individual basis.

Th 515. Christian Devotional Literature (Every Semester)

This is a reading course in Christian devotional literature, designed to stimulate spiritual growth and understanding in seminarians by means of first-hand acquaintance with selected portions of great Christian literature.  Note: This course must be approved on an individual basis.

Th 611. Systematic Theology I (Fall/2008; Summer 2009)

The nature, necessity, and divisions of theology are studied on an advanced level. The study includes an analysis of the Christian and non-Christian world views of God; and a survey in the fields of Bibliology, Theology, Angelology, Anthropology and Hamartiology.

Th 612. Systematic Theology II (January/2009; Spring 2010)

This course consists of advanced studies in Christology, Soteriology, Ecclesiology and Eschatology. Special emphasis is given to the fundamentals of the Christian faith.

Th 621. Selected Topics in Theology (Sys/Bib) (As Needed)

Specialized and advanced studies are made in various topics of systematic and/or biblical theology. The distinctive theological emphases of a particular writer or of a certain book of the Bible may be studied.  Note: The course may be repeated when different subject matter is studied.

Th 632. Master’s Research Thesis (As Needed)

Students may enroll in this course for six to twelve hours of credit. The course consists of a research project or thesis with individualized and specialized assignments. Faculty members will approve, supervise and evaluate the project.

CE 411. Christian Ethics (Fall/2008; Spring 2010)

A survey is made of the principles of Christian behavior as outlined in the Old and New Testaments, in church history, and in contemporary Christianity. The purpose of the course is to acquaint students with biblical guidelines in Christian conduct.

CE 611. Selected Topics in Christian Ethics (As Needed)

From a Christian worldview perspective, this course treats current issues in moral philosophy within the purview of deontology, teleology, and utilitarian laws. Topics of special interest addressed in the course include: death, definition and the criteria for measuring; abortion; euthanasia; genetics; and others of contemporary significance.

Philosophy of Religion

PhR 411. Christian Philosophy (As Needed)

This is an introductory study in the field of Christian philosophy, focusing on a biblical epistemology and relating this to the patterns of changing philosophies.

PhR 412. Current Movements in Religion (Fall/2009)

A survey is made of the leading cults, sects, and movements in contemporary America, exclusive of the major non-Christian religions of the world.

PhR 511. Apologetics (Fall/2009)

A study of the defense of the Christian-theistic world view is made against the background of a brief survey of antitheistic thought and representative approaches to Christian apologetics from the Greek Fathers through the modern era. Emphasis is given to methodologies and proposals in light of biblical revelation.

PhR 515. Special Studies in Philosophy of Religion (As Needed)

This course is designed to offer specialized and advanced studies in various facets of philosophy, theology, or ethics for a Christian world view.  Issues may be of contemporary or classical importance.

Church History

CH 411. History of World Religions (Fall/2009)

This study is designed to acquaint the student with the major living religions of today other than Christianity: Animism (Folk Religions), Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Shintoism, Taoism, Islam and Judaism.

CH 412. History of Christianity (Spring/2009; 2010)

The development of Christianity is traced from its inception in the first century through twentieth-century Christianity. Special emphasis is given to the Conciliar period from 325 to 451, the Renaissance, the Reformation period, denominationalism, rationalism, revivalism, and the ecumenical movement.

CH 511. General Church History I (Fall/2009; 2010)

A general survey of church history is made, beginning with the Book of Acts and moving through the Medieval period. Special attention is given to the rise and progress of the Roman and Greek Catholic Churches and the impact of the Christian religion on Western culture.

CH 512. General Church History II (Spring/2009; January/2010)

This is a continuation of CH 511, surveying Christianity from the Reformation to the present. Emphasis is given to the influence of Bible translations, the rise of numerous sects originating after the Reformation, and the secularization of Christianity.

CH 621. Survey of Baptist Heritage (Hist/Theol) (Spring/2009)

The historical and theological background of our Baptist faith is covered by means of lectures and research assignments. Careful study is made of the leading so-called heretical movements, their teachings, practices, and radical emphases. Note: The course may be repeated one time when different material is studied.

CH 631. Special Studies in Church History (Hist/Theol) (Spring/2010)

This course is designed to offer specialized and advanced studies in various topics of church history and theology. Issues are selected which have had significant impact in the history of the church. Note: May be repeated with a different topic.

CHURCH MINISTRIES FIELD

Evangelism

Ev 311. Biblical Evangelism and Discipleship I: Evangelism Explosion (Every Semester)

A careful study of the biblical, theological, and historical bases for evangelism is made. Using the Evangelism Explosion model, each student is assigned to a three-member team under the supervision of an “EE certified trainer.” Teams meet together for one hour of study each week and then go out into the community to call on prospects. Following the visits, the teams meet again for a report and praise session.

Ev 411. Biblical Evangelism and Discipleship II: Evangelism Explosion (Every Semester)

This course is a continuation of Ev 311. Students who receive “EE certification” at the completion of the previous semester serve as “trainers” this semester. The same procedures are followed as those described above.

Ev 511. Biblical Evangelism and Discipleship I (Every Semester)

The course in a practical study of the biblical, theological, and historical basis for evangelism; students will be exposed to both academic and practical aspects of the discipline.  Through supervised field experiences, class activities and special studies, students are expected to enhance their skill for organizing and promoting a program of evangelism in a local church.  Through lecture, discussion, additional research, and reading students are expected to develop a theology of evangelism.

Ev. 512. Biblical Evangelism and Discipleship II (Every Semester)

This course is designed to provide advanced study of Biblical principles and theory for Christian evangelism and discipleship.  The course uses weekly field ministry to give attention to development of communication and evaluation skills and effective methods for training others in evangelism.  The course is also designed to expose students to persons within varied cultural and social contexts.  Prerequisite: Ev 311 or Ev 511.

Ev 521. Special Studies in Evangelism (As Needed)

This course allows a student to explore different emphases in evangelism as applied to different age groups, cults, world religions, or as applied in specialized geographical settings (e.g. urban or resort areas). Particular goals, skills, and requirements will be selected according to the individual needs of the student. Prerequisite: Ev 311.

Preaching

Pr 311. The Preparation and Delivery of Sermons (Fall/2008; 2009; Summer/2010)

This course is designed to provide comprehensive instruction in homiletics. Students are tutored in the gathering, organizing, discarding, and filing of materials related to the texts, ideas, theses, and objectives of their sermons. Oral communication skills are also enhanced by means of video replay and critical evaluation of sermons preached in the class room.

Pr 412. Special Studies in Sermon Delivery (As Needed)

The specific emphasis of this course is upon sermon delivery with a review of basic principles of preaching.  Special attention will be given to the key elements of verbal presentation, body language, grammar, history, context, and proper attire as it relates to expository preaching.  Students will preach several sermons in class and participate in constructive evaluation of their peers.  Class size will determine the number of sermons delivered by students.  The course will also include critique of selected preachers.  Prerequisite: Pr 311.

Pr 511. Special Studies in Expository Preaching (As Needed)

Students are guided in the techniques and skills of expository preaching by inductive means. Expository sermons are developed from assigned passages in the Bible and delivered during the class sessions. Each sermon prepared and preached is given a detailed evaluation with regard to its nature, type and formulation.

Pr 611. Homiletics (Fall/2008; 2009; Summer 2010)

The course offers advanced study of oral communication theory and the implementation of skills required for an effective pulpit ministry. Attention is given to preparation of individual sermons, sermon series, special occasions, and year-long preaching calendars. Students also study the preparation processes and sermon-delivery styles of notable preachers, past and present.

Note: Either Pr 611 or 511 will satisfy the M.Div. requirement in preaching.

Pastoral Ministries

PM 311. The Christian Ministry (Spring/2009; 2010)

Principles of pastoral ministry and church administration are studied both inductively and deductively. Essential elements are gleaned inductively from analytical and interpretative studies in the pastoral epistles. Neglected aspects, not found in the pastorals, are covered deductively in a systematic way.

PM 321. Worship Leadership (Spring/2009; 2010)

This course is designed to prepare the student for a leadership role in Christian worship. Study is made of the biblical concepts, nature, and principles of worship. Special attention is given to the orders, methods, and materials which are conducive to the planning and implementation of worship in various settings.

PM 411. Ministry and Finance (Church/Pastor) (Spring/2009; 2010)

Concepts of accounting relating to church business (or to the pastor) will be introduced. Students will be taught in detail laws affecting the Christian ministry and the responsibilities they might have, as ministers, to the Internal Revenue Service.

PM 412. Ministry and the Smaller Church (Fall/2008; 2009)

This course is designed to explore challenges of ministering in a small church. Attention will be given to time management, spiritual discipline, administrative tasks, preaching style, financial management, and other ministry tasks which are shaped by the requirements of the small church. Emphasis is given to the development of ministry characteristics which will be satisfactory to both the church and the pastor.

PM 413. Studies in Ministry (As Needed)

This course is a supervised study in the field of Christian ministry. Specific topics, goals, and requirements are selected according to the needs of students. Possible areas of study include leadership in ministry, pastoral ministry, preaching, and evangelism.

PM 414. Church Growth (As Needed)

This is a dual emphasis course consisting of a review of the basic principles of evangelism and a survey of the basic concepts of church growth. The material is presented with a view toward application in the church setting where the student holds membership.

PM 415. Cultural Diversity in Ministry (As Needed)

This is a dual emphasis course consisting of a review of the basic principles of evangelism and a survey of the basic concepts of church growth.  The material is presented with a view toward application in the church setting where the student holds membership.

PM 511. Pastoral Ministry (Spring/2009; 2010)

Attention is given to the nature of a call to pastoral ministry or a staff position in church ministries. A study is made of church organization and administration, finances, and staff relationships. Brief attention is given to parliamentary procedure, denominational (associational) work, and public relations. Note: Master’s students who have taken PM 311 must substitute another level III course for this one.

PM 512. Special Studies in Ministry (Every Semester)

This course is a supervised study in the field of Christian Ministry. Specific topics, goals, and requirements are selected according to the needs of particular students. Possible areas of study include pastoral ministry, preaching, evangelism, and missions. Note: The course may be repeated once with the approval of the Dean and the appropriate professor. Prerequisite: Either PM 311 or PM 511.

PM 515. Special Studies in Discipleship (Fall/2008; As Needed)

This course is a specialized study in the area of Christian Discipleship. Emphasis is given to the student’s development of a proper understanding and the application of Biblical principles for discipleship. Students are exposed to practical resources, topics and strategies for effective discipleship. Prerequisite: EV 411.

PM 521. Theology of Worship (Spring/2009; 2010)

As a specialized study into the theology, traditions and history of worship, development of worship styles in relation to historical theology are researched. These developments are related to the various contemporary trends in churches. Students develop their own practical theologies of worship.

PM 533. Pastoral Internship (Every Semester)

This course provides an opportunity for students to serve in some pastoral capacity in a church under the supervision of a full-time pastor approved by the faculty. A minimum of nine (9) hours per week (eight hours of supervised ministry plus one hour of formal instruction) for fifteen weeks is required. Note: The course may be repeated once when a different area is covered.

PM 632. Master’s Research Project (As Needed)

Students may enroll in this course for six to twelve hours of credit. The course consists of a research project or thesis with individualized and specialized assignments. Faculty members will approve, supervise and evaluate the project.

Language

Span 311. Spanish for Ministry (As Needed)

An introductory study of the Spanish language is made, including grammar, listening, speaking, and reading. Emphasis is placed on the development of conversational skills needed for ministry to Spanish speaking peoples.

Span 312. Spanish for Ministry (As Needed)

This is a continuation of Spanish 311, consisting of a review of the basic elements of Spanish grammar, including listening, speaking, and reading. Emphasis is given to learning and using evangelism materials and common language skills within a ministry context.

Math

Math 111. General Math (Spring/2009)

Designed to meet the needs of students not specializing in mathematics, it surveys the history of numerical systems and various basic topics in mathematics including fractions, percentages, proportions and ratios, the metric system and graphs. It also involves the practical application of such concepts for ministry.

Missions

Miss 311. History & Philosophy of Missions (Spring/2009)

This is a general course in the history and philosophy of missions from the first century to the present. Major emphasis is given to the development of mission fields in modern times in such locations as Mexico, India, China, Philippines, and Africa. Attention is also given to world conditions as they influence the strategy of missions work.

Miss 312. Church Planting (January/2009)

This course explores the basic principles of planting churches and helping small existing churches to fulfill the commission of Christ, and to grow to meet contemporary needs. Special attention is given to problems facing the new or small developing church. The course is structured as follows: 1. Biblical basis for new churches; 2. A vision for church planting; 3. Prerequisites for doing the work of a church planter.

Miss 315. Cross-Cultural Church Planting (As Needed)

The purpose of the course is to equip students in leading churches to develop a strategy for reaching out to Hispanic populations within their communities and to develop a strategy for locating and training Hispanics who can become leaders in Hispanic churches. Principles learned may also be applied to non-Hispanic cultures.

Miss 316. Missionary Internship (Every Summer)

Practical internship training is made available on a home mission field in the United States, or with an ethnic or language minority group within the United States, or on a field outside of the United States, under the supervision of a full-time missionary. A minimum of nine (9) hours per week (eight hours of supervised ministry plus one hour of formal instruction) for fifteen weeks is required. Note: The course may be repeated once when a different area is covered.

Miss 317. Missions Practicum (As Needed)

This class is designed to expose students to mission fields on a short-term basis. Students visit a mission project in the U.S. or abroad for a minimum of 5 days under the direction of a missionary. Preparatory reading and research and a journal and analysis of field activity are required.

Miss 516. Graduate Missionary Internship (Every Semester)

Research and practical training is made available on a mission field in the United States, or with an ethnic or language minority group within the United States, or on a field outside of the United States, under the supervision of a full-time missionary.  Attention is given to effective ministerial leadership, cultural interaction, and applicable issues of missiology.  For requirements see “Practical Internship Training” above.  Prerequisite: Miss 521.  Note: The course may be repeated once when a different area is covered.

Miss 517. Graduate Missionary Practicum (Every Semester)

This class is designed to expose students to mission fields on a short-term basis.  Students visit a mission project in the U.S. or abroad for a minimum of 5 days under the direction of a missionary.  Preparatory reading and research and a journal and analysis of field activity are required.

Miss 521. Selected Topics in Missions (January/2009; Spring/2010)

Specialized and advanced studies are made in various topics related to missions. Topics of special interest addressed in the course may include but are not limited to church planting, history and philosophy of missions, missions in a cross-cultural setting, specific regions or nations, college campuses, and internships.

Music

Music 311. Ministry of Music (As Needed)

This course is designed primarily to provide music directors with a practical working knowledge of the procedures involved in planning and coordinating a music program for a church.

Music 312. Choral Conducting (As Needed)

The principles of choral conducting as they relate to worship and church music programs constitute the focal point of this course.

CHRISTIAN EDUCATION FIELD

Religious Education

RE 311. Church Administration (Fall/2008; 2009)

Students are made aware of the general organization and activities of the local church.  The study includes consideration of how the church can and should use organizations in fulfilling the Lord’s Commission.

RE 312. Computer Arts I (Fall/2008; 2009)

Students learn a variety of practical applications for personal (micro) computers. Emphasis is given to developing a basic vocabulary for computer operators and making efficient and practical use of word processing, data base management, spreadsheet, and other types of software that are beneficial to people in management and leadership positions. Note: Lab fee, $35.00. Prerequisite: Keyboarding Proficiency

RE 313. Introduction to Christian Education (Spring/2009)

A study of the history of religious education is made. Various philosophies of Christian education as they have developed are highlighted with emphasis given to the student developing his/her philosophy of religious education. Trends and issues in the practice of Christian education today are identified.

RE 314. Research and Writing (As Needed)

A study is made of the meaning and purpose of research. Students are directed through the process of utilizing tools, clarifying purposes, choosing methods, and drawing conclusions as the result of careful research. The course involves the use of a word processor. Attention may be given to principles of grammar and punctuation, as well as such standard methods of exposition as narration-description, comparison-contrast, classification-division, and argumentation.

RE 315. Computer Arts II (Spring/2009; 2010)

A continuation of Computer Arts I. Emphasis is given to special features of word processing, data base management, spreadsheet, and other types of software that are beneficial to people in management and leadership positions. Prerequisite: RE 312. Note: Lab fee, $35.00.

RE 317. Creative Teaching (Fall/2009)

A detailed study is made of effective teaching/learning methods. The areas of art, books, home-living, music, nature, puzzles, Bible verses, creative writing, discussion, drama, games, learning centers, prayer, and research are explored. Teacher-training conferences are designed and demonstrated in class presentations.

RE 321. Ministry of Youth (Fall/2009)

This course consists of a study of the position of youth minister, i.e., qualifications, job description, staff relations, and administration, relationship to parents and youth, and the problems encountered by the Youth Minister. Emphasis is given to resources for personal and professional growth.

RE 325. Christian Psychology (Fall/2008; 2009; Summer/2010)

Students are introduced to the basic principles of psychology. A study of human behavior and how it applies to specific functions of the minister is also made: preaching, efforts to strengthen the congregation, community work, and evangelism.

RE 326. Introduction to Christian Counseling (Spring/2009; 2010)

Theories and techniques which are necessary for Christian counseling are taught. Development of the student’s own philosophy of the counseling process is initiated. Practical counseling and evaluation techniques are introduced.

RE 327. Group Counseling (Spring/2009)

This course provides experience in interpersonal relationships through the group counseling process. Theory and procedures of group counseling and group leadership are explored. Applications of the small group process to the ministry of the local church are examined. Prerequisite: Either RE 325 or RE 326.

RE 422. Special Studies in Religious Education (Every Semester)

This course is a supervised study designed to develop selected skills in the field of religious education. Particular goals, skills, and requirements are selected according to the individual needs of the student. Note: The course may be repeated once with approval of the Dean and an appropriate professor.

RE 511: Principles of Church Administration (Fall/2008; 2009)

Through study and specialized research, students should be able to identify various components of church administration.  The course is intended to make students aware of administrative principles of leading and organizing a church and to develop competency for guiding a church in carrying out a Biblical ministry program.

RE 512. Administrative Christian Leadership (Spring/2009; Summer/2010)

A study of theories, types, and principles of administrative leadership is made. Special emphasis is given to the pastoral ministries field; educational, music, and youth directors; and lay persons involved in leadership positions.

RE 514. Principles of Christian Teaching (Fall/2008; Summer/2009)

This course consists of a study of the teaching ministry of the church: its importance, principles, techniques, and methods. The course is designed to improve the Christian worker’s teaching ability in planning and presenting a lesson.

RE 515. Christian Education of Various Groups (Every Semester)

This is a study of the characteristics, nature, and needs physically, intellectually, emotionally, socially and spiritually either of children, youth, or adults. Focus is placed upon the ministry of the church to the particular groups.

RE 525. Adult Development and Aging (Spring/2010)

This course surveys human growth and development during adulthood. Special emphasis is placed upon counseling needs, transitions, and life goals of adults at various stages of development. The “Baby-Boomers” and older adults are two of the special areas of concentration.

RE 527. Pre-Marital and Marital Counseling (Fall/2008; 2009)

This course is designed to help the minister in his counseling relationships with persons who are contemplating marriage. Such problems as courtship, choosing a life companion, engagement, and marital, social and emotional adjustments are studied. Prerequisite: RE 326 or 536.

RE 528. Crisis Counseling (Spring/2009; 2010)

The student is instructed in a specialized approach to counseling in crisis situations. Such crises as attempted suicide, death in the family, unwed motherhood, alcoholism, drug abuse, and other related subjects are considered. Prerequisite: RE 326 or 536.

RE 532. Religious Education Internship (Every Semester)

This internship provides for a student to serve in some educational capacity in a church or other agency under the supervision of a professor and a field supervisor. A minimum of nine (9) hours per week (eight hours of supervised ministry plus one hour of formal instruction) for fifteen weeks is required. Note: The course may be repeated once when a different area is covered.

RE 533. Clinical Pastoral Education (Every Semester)

BMA Seminary grants academic credit up to six semester hours to those students who satisfactorily complete the work-study program at an approved CPE training center. In this program, students learn pastoral skills within a clinical context under the direct supervision of a trained clergyman.

RE 535. Advanced Christian Psychology (Fall/2008; 2009; Summer/2010)

Students are introduced to the basic principles of psychology. A study of human behavior and how it applies to specific functions of the minister is made: preaching, efforts to strengthen the congregations, community work, evangelism. Students conduct appropriate research into current applications.

RE 536. Principles of Christian Counseling (Spring/2009; 2010)

Theories and techniques which are necessary for Christian counseling are taught. Development of the student’s own philosophy of the counseling process is advanced. Practical counseling and evaluation techniques are introduced. Research into practical applications is made.

RE 612. Personal Computing for the Ministry (As Needed)

Students are introduced to a variety of practical applications for personal (micro) computers. Emphasis is given to developing a basic vocabulary for computer operators and making efficient and practical use of word processing, data management, spreadsheet, and other types of software that are beneficial to people in management and leadership positions. Note: Lab fee, $35.00.

RE 631. Special Studies in Religious Education (Every Semester)

This course is a supervised study designed to develop selected skills in the field of religious education. Particular goals, skills, and requirements are selected according to the individual needs of the student. Note: The course may be repeated once with approval of the Dean and an appropriate professor.

RE 632. Special Studies in Computer Applications (As Needed)

Students who already have a rudimentary knowledge of personal computing (such as basics of word processing) are introduced to a variety of specialized applications of computer software, such as desktop publishing, data base management, and spreadsheet applications. Prerequisite: RE 312. Note: Lab fee, $35.00.

RE 634. Advanced Clinical Pastoral Education (Every Semester)

This is Clinical Pastoral Education promoted on the advanced level. The course may be taken for from six to twelve semester hours of credit. Prerequisite: The student must have completed a minimum of one unit of Basic CPE (RE 533).

PRACTICAL INTERNSHIP TRAINING

Baptist Missionary Association Theological Seminary offers interested students several practical internship courses in actual field training. A minimum of nine (9) hours per week (eight hours of supervised ministry plus one hour of formal instruction) for fifteen weeks are performed under the direction of a missionary, pastor, education/youth director, or campus minister. Special assignments are made by the professor before the student leaves for the field. The appropriate faculty member must approve the field of internship study before final plans and work can begin. Moreover, a student must have completed 12 hours of seminary work before taking internship courses. Twelve hours credit is the maximum any student may take in internship and clinical pastoral education courses.

RE 532. Religious Education Internship (Every Semester)

This internship provides for a student to serve in some educational capacity in a church or other agency under the supervision of a professor and a field supervisor. A minimum of nine (9) hours per week (eight hours of supervised ministry plus one hour of formal instruction) for fifteen weeks is required. Note: The course may be repeated once.

PM 533. Pastoral Internship (Every Semester)

This course provides an opportunity for students to serve in some pastoral capacity in a church under the supervision of a full-time pastor approved by the faculty. A minimum of nine (9) hours per week (eight hours of supervised ministry plus one hour of formal instruction) for fifteen weeks is required. Note: The course may be repeated once when a different area is covered.

Miss 316. Missionary Internship (Every Summer)

Practical internship training is made available on a home mission field in the United States, or with an ethnic or language minority group within the United States, or on a field outside of the United States, under the supervision of a full-time missionary. For requirements see “Practical Internship Training” above. Note: The course may be repeated once when a different area is covered. Note: Twelve semester hours is the maximum any student may earn through internship studies.

DISTANCE LEARNING

Graduate Distance Learning

The seminary provides credit for courses offered by the Institute of Theological Studies (ITS). Approval of credit must be granted by the seminary dean. ITS courses include lectures (twenty-four audiocassette lectures, forty-five minute lessons) and study guides (printed lectures outlines, reflection questions, course assignments and bibliography). Some courses are available through the Internet (“ITS On-line”) and on compressed CD. Specialized studies are available in the areas of Old Testament, New Testament, Systematic Theology, Ethics, Apologetics, Missions, Church History, Ministry, and Leadership.

Undergraduate Correspondence Courses

When taken for credit, these courses may be applied toward the Associate of Divinity Degree. Level II (300-400) courses also may be applied toward the Bachelor of Arts in Religion Degree. Non-credit courses may be used to earn a Certificate or Diploma of Christian Leadership. (See p. 61 for details.)

Biblical Studies Field

OT 113c. Old Testament Survey

This course is a general survey of the entire Old Testament, including history, geography, and literature. The origin and growth of the Hebrew nation are emphasized.

NT 123c. New Testament Survey

This course is a survey of the entire New Testament. The general background, authorship, and content of the various books of the New Testament are covered. The life and work of Jesus, the organization of churches and early missionary enterprises are especially stressed.

NT 213c. Life of Christ

This course is an examination of the factual basis of Christianity as it is found in the life and teaching of Jesus Christ. The purpose of the course is to promote subjective comprehension and response to the basic truths of Christianity which emerge from the gospels according to Matthew, Mark, Luke and John.

NT 223c. Life of Paul

This course is designed to enlighten the student in Pauline chronology and to survey pertinent historical incidents which affected or coincided with his ministry. Special emphasis is given to the environmental background of early Christianity as recorded in the Acts of the Apostles.

BI 211c. Bible Geography

This course involves a survey of the geographical backgrounds of the lands of the Bible. Biblical geography is considered in the physical setting of sacred scripture the progressive relation of the redemptive movements beginning with Abraham and culminating with Jesus and the apostles in the Roman Empire.

BI 212c. Manners and Customs of Bible Times

This course involves the study of manners and customs of the people who lived in Bible lands. Knowing Oriental manners and customs is necessary to a thorough mastery of the Bible. It is a mistake to read into Scriptures Western manners and customs. The Bible should be interpreted in the light of Eastern customs and culture.

Church Ministries Field

Ev 111c. Introduction to Discipleship and Evangelism

The principles and procedures of the “Paul-Timothy relationship” are taught and implemented. Students are asked to examine their devotional and spiritual lives; to develop good daily habits in Bible study, prayer, Scripture memorization, witnessing, and other needed activities.

Pr 111c. Oral Communication

This course introduces the student to the principles of sermon construction and delivery. Students are directed in the selection and exegesis of texts, from which sermon ideas, theses, and objectives for sermons are formulated. The principles and procedures learned are implemented in the preparation of sermon manuscripts.

PM 111c. Introduction to the Christian Ministry

This course provides an orientation to Christian ministry in the contemporary culture. Special attention is given to the theology, nature, mission and ministry of the church. Different aspects of pastoral care, administration, and ministry are covered. Images of the ministry in varied contexts are also considered.

Christian Education Field

RE 111c. Introduction to Psychology

This course is designed for those who have little or no background in the field of psychology. Students are made aware of the meaning and Christian application of

the elementary concepts of psychology. Topical areas of pastoral care are assigned to involve students with current studies in human behavior.

RE 112c. Church Involvement in Total Ministry

A study of the duties of the church staff as to their leadership in the use of the church’s membership, conducting of worship, evangelistic outreach, teaching ministry, and in the promotion of stewardship is the focus of this course.

RE 211c. Teaching for Results

This is a study of the principles, techniques, and methods of Christian teaching. The course is designed to improve the Christian worker’s lesson planning and teaching ability. Emphasis is given to the goal of teaching for results.

 

 

 

Baptist Missionary Association Theological Seminary  1530 East Pine St.   Jacksonville, TX  75766 
(903) 586-2501    Monday-Friday 8:00 am to 4:45 pm Central Time   Fax (903) 586-0378

 

 

 

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